Tag Archives: travel

Yoga and Flying

Summer is here, time to broaden your horizons and go exploring! But, flying at 39,000 feet has its downsides – DVT, stiffness and tension to name a few. Check out the top Yoga postures to keep you chilled and stretched out in the sky… and we can even help alleviate the dreaded jet lag!

 

How can yoga help regular fliers? Which areas of the body can it help relieve stiffness from sitting down for hours on end?

 

Having a yoga practice is the best preventative for issues to do with flying; the cramp, stiffness, swelling from poor circulation, and even reducing the likelihood of vein issues as the tissues around the veins are soft and open and circulation in general is improved.  This is mainly because a yoga practice opens the fascia (the connective tissue) of the body, stretches it and improves general circulation, so that when flying you already have better circulation and lymph drainage.

Then adding a few yoga movements to your flight time will just boost the already healthy functionality your body has. However keeping moving while on a flight can help prevent DVT as well as stiffness and lack of circulation. Yoga stretches can reduce stiffness we can experience in neck, shoulders, legs, hips, lower back and calves and feet.

 

What other benefits does practising yoga bring?

The benefits of yoga are well documented, but include greater range of motion of the entire body, no more aches and pains, increased strength, stamina, flexibility, and a greater sense of mental and emotional wellbeing. It balances blood pressure, cholesterol levels, burns calories and prevents degeneration and wear and tear on the joints. People don’t realise that nearly every other form of exercise, specifically sports, like running, cycling, football and even the gym, are ageing the joints of the body.

People are obsessed with “cardio” fitness, but at what cost?  A healthy heart and good stamina in a crippled body? Yoga is healthy for your joints, while still creating optimum fitness and stamina.

Whatever inconvenience it is to get started in a yoga practice is a tiny fraction of the inconvenience of living in a painful body or being ill.

Yoga is concentrating on the spine as the nervous system is originating from brain via spine to the entire body, so by preventing compression on the discs, the nerves benefit and therefore the entire body’s function. Other benefits are that stretching brings increased blood supply and oxygenation to the body.

Add the mental calmness and sense of vitality and wellbeing yoga brings, are what has made yoga so popular.

Hip opening, knee alignment, strength and flexibility, leg strength and full body integration and are what you should expect from any good yoga class.

 

What’s special about hot yoga and how does it work?

Hot yoga is taught in a room heated to between 90 degrees to 100 degrees. A reputable studio with well trained teachers will have good oxygenation and humidity, and use properly trained instructors.

 

The working temperature of your muscles and joints is around 100 degrees, this ensures the synovial fluid is thinned and can move around the joint lubricating it and bring nutrition. The heat warms the muscles and joints to ensure safe stretching. Far more injuries occur by exercising in cold rooms. That’s why all exercise systems have a warm up but hot yoga means your body stays warm throughout. It also means you do not feel stiff the next day. Hot yoga students will all tell you that the heat is emotionally and mentally cathartic. Seeing your body dripping with sweat, breathing deeply, feeling open, and healthy have a positive effect on our mood.

Now that Hot Yoga is mainstream, one can’t be sure exactly what you are going to get. Check your studios credentials or go to a recognized system such as Fierce Grace.

 

How does it work? 

Classical yoga concentrates on the spine, as that is the core of physical wellbeing, hip opening, strength and alignment, leg strength and full body integration.  It moves us to our “edge” physically and we press against this edge building flexibility and strength. The beauty of yoga is that it is just the body’s natural range of motion, usually done in static poses, so we can safely improve and strengthen whatever our level. Beginners and advanced alike work together to their own ability.

 

We have countless students who have reported lower blood pressure and cholesterol from doing hot yoga.

Sweating is the other reason people love hot yoga. It is an important way to detoxify the body, as the skin is the largest organ in the body. It is necessary to make sure we sweat regularly to help remove toxicity from the body.

 

 

What’s the best time of day to go to a yoga class?

 

Everyone is different, and really in our busy lives I would re commend just to go when you can and when fits best into your schedule. It is better to water a plant sometimes, than never. It’s beneficial any time of day. Some people prefer the buzz that a morning class gives them for their day, others love how relaxed it makes them and how well they sleep by going to class after work so they get home de-stressed from their day. If you are low on energy, go in the morning, if you find it hard to relax, go later in the day. Yoga gives you what you need. Traditionally yoga was practiced at sunrise, looking a the sun.

 

What type of yoga is best to relieve jetlag?

Many people swear by getting off a plane and getting to a yoga class as soon as they can as it seems to have an amazing effect on jetlag. I would recommend after all the rush of getting ready to fly, the body and mind need calming and relaxing, so a gentler class is probably more grounding and relaxing.

Jetlag can make us feel very enervated. Some people love an energizing yoga class to get their metabolism kick started and their circulation boosted, others prefer a relaxing one, some deep breathing and centering, to bring them back to a grounded feeling. Either way, getting some movement, deep breathing or stretching to relieve tension is beneficial to speed up the body’s ability to return to it’s normal rhythms.

There is a yoga protocol for jetlag which is to spin (Sufi style twirling) in the opposite direction to which you flew – you stand with your arms out to the sides shoulder height. Your head is North, left hand is East and right hand is West. If you flew East to West you would twirl turning to the left. Spin slowly for about a minute, or as long as you can. It undoes the disturbance to the electromagnetic fields that have been disturbed in your body. There have been scientific studies on this and there is a book written on this by the Adi Da Samraj.

 

What can long haul passengers do on board to help relieve muscle tension and stiffness?

Some really good exercises are Seated Pigeon, Forward Fold, and Yogi Twists.

For Seated Pigeon you stay seated and place your right ankle across your left knee and let your right knee drop down, it may go as low as parallel with your left. Left foot flat on the floor. Flex your right foot. Lean forward until you feel a stretch through your right hip, buttock and lower back.  One can add a twist by placing ones right arm at ones right foot or knee in this position and twisting to the left to release even more tension from the lower back and hip. Repeat on the other side.

For Forward Fold, go to the back of the plane and feet hip width apart bend your knees and fold forward keeping your abdomen and chest touching your legs. Hang down there, you can hold your elbows for a nice release of shoulders. Let your head hang. bend your knees more or less to feel hips lower neck and hamstrings stretch, but keep your abdomen always touching your thighs to protect your lower back.

While at back of plane or inside the washroom, you can place your feet hip width apart, arms at 90 degrees as if you were power walking and with knees only 2” bent you move one hip forward and then the other (as if your pelvis was a record on a turntable being rotated on a horizontal plane) do this fast while you pull your belly in and exhale through the nose once on each swivel. Bring one hip forward then the other, fast until you feel your entire spine moving and twisting. Powerful exhales. This irrigates each vertebra, brings circulation to hips, spine, digestive system, eliminatory system, tones the waist, prevents constipation and loosens, releases tension in your spine and makes you feel energized.

 

Happy holidays from the FG Brixton team. 

 

Airplane Yoga: practice while you travel

We know that Warrior III into Airplane arms is great for balance and core. When we’ve mastered it – it can feel as free as flying!

If you’re actually flying this month (see what we did there!) whether long haul or short haul, the combination of sitting for a long period of time, air conditioning and carrying heavy luggage can take its tole on the body – just when you want to be your best for adventures or relaxing by the pool.

We’ve been looking into how you can take Fierce Grace into the air, increase circulation, avoid deep vein thromboses and practice yoga while you travel.

Seated Spinal Twist

To stretch out the spine, sit up tall, grab the sides of your seat, twist to the left and right and hold for a few seconds each side. Then try using your left arm to grab the right side of the seat and extend, lifting your spine and chest to twist your head to look further back over your shoulder. Give the person behind you a little smile!

Modified Eagle Pose

Usually done standing, but this modification is great to open up between the shoulder-blades: put your hands up in front of your face, then cross the arms at the elbows, cross your forearms and wind palms until your wrists touch, then finally lift the arms up slowly.

Mini-Lunge

On your way to the bathroom, try out some mini lunges. Holding the lunge in a modified version of a Warrior I pose to fit the small space can also work the hips, legs and calves.

Cat-Cow

You can modify popular poses like cat and cow (done on your hands and knees) and do them while standing or sitting instead. Just bend your knees and place your hands slightly above your knees. Then alternate between rounding your spine like a dome (cat) and curving it like an arch (cow). Place your hands on your thighs and as you inhale, tilt your pelvis and abdomen outward and allow your chest to arch up and forward. As you exhale, curl your pelvis inwards and backwards, arching your spine outwards, lower your chin as your chest moves inwards.

Tree-Pose
This standing pose in which you place the sole of one foot against the inner thigh of your other leg and raise your arms to your chest or over your head (you can use a wall by the bathroom for balance), can open up tight hips and relieve lower back pain. A small price to pay for the possible eyebrow raise from another passenger – they’re probably thinking it’s a great idea!

Breathing

If you’re an anxious traveller, focus back to the breath to find peace within the body. Take a deep breath through your nose; allow your chest and core to fill up with air. On the exhale, lips are sealed and throat is slightly constricted creating a small hissing noise. Make the same sound on the inhale and continue for 1 minute.

 

Happy Holidays!

Teacher feature: Daniel Gleeson

This month we meet one of our teachers who knows a thing or two about travel, as his non-yoga alter ego is a full time flight attendant.

 

 

What brought you to yoga and what about it made you stay?

I’ve always been interested in fitness & exercise, and so a few years ago, like many others, I decided to try out the phenomenon that was Bikram yoga. Straightaway I was fascinated by it; trying to use my body in a different way, becoming so much more aware of it, understanding its capabilities and limitations, all simply by striking a pose on a mat. Not long afterwards, I discovered Fierce Grace, and I loved it even more – I found it to be a much better fit for me. In terms of attitude, variety, humour, and approach, I knew immediately that my yoga had found a new permanent home.

 

Why did you decide to become a yoga teacher?

I don’t think teaching yoga is something to take up on a whim. I spent a long time deciding whether or not to train. Teaching (anything) is a humbling and rewarding experience, and should always be approached as such. Too many times I’ve been in yoga classes whose teachers are disinterested, or overpowering, or serious, or massaging their egos, or ignorant of the varying abilities in the class. All of these qualities only serve to turn people away. So I wanted show that yoga can be taught without any of these things, but with quite the opposite; playfulness, alignment, professionalism, passion. And above all, a sense of humour.

 

You’ve recently started to teach Wild at Brixton – what do you like about Wild? Why would you recommend it to members?

I love Wild because it’s tough. But still satisfyingly so. I think yoga or exercise or fitness of any type NEEDS to be challenging – this works your body, maintains your interest, and suggests ongoing improvement. Wild definitely offers all this. Throughout the class there’s usually groans of pain, sighs of relief (and disbelief!), and even the odd smile…!

Also, back on the issue of trying to get more men into yoga, I think Wild helps to address this through its format – a brilliant yoga/bodyweight/cardio crossover. Wild offers a more strength-based repetition-style workout, which still uses yoga influence & techniques, which I think is more appealing to men with little yoga experience/background.

So for men AND women I’d recommend trying Wild for the variety it offers.

 

As a flight attendant, can you share your ‘Top Tips For A Good Flight’?

I’ve flown long-haul for many years now, so I’ve seen people have good flights… and bad flights! A lot of it comes down to preparedness – physical and mental. Especially for longer flights, I’d try to be at least a little prepared; take water and snacks, load your iPad with things to read and watch, be aware of the flight length AND time change.

On board, just try to take things in your stride – sharing a confined space with other people for a prolonged time is going to push your buttons at some point. Like a busy yoga class!

Long-haul flying isn’t always a pleasant experience, but you can make it much easier on your body & mind by approaching it well. Arriving at a destination I ALWAYS try to stay with the sun – if it’s light, try to stay awake, then try to wind down and sleep when it goes dark. I find my body responds better to light/dark triggers than anything else.

 

Which Yoga Poses do you recommend when flying?

In terms of yoga on boardspace is very limited – unless you’re sitting further forwards! Neck stretching is an easy ad obvious exercise – side to side, and rolling forwards. Gentle spine twisting when seated is something I do on board. Also a quick Standing Pigeon hip stretch each side, maybe while waiting for the washroom!

When trying to battle jetlag post-flight, try calming postures which work into the hips after sitting for so long, like Half Tortoise, Reclining Pigeon, full Pigeon.

 

What’s on your Fierce Grace playlist?

I love the use of music in a yoga class, I think it can really enhance it. But… it can also detract from it too! Mismatched or obscure music during class can really spoil the experience.

I have four different playlists I use for the FG class, but I’m always looking for music to help me create more! I’ll hear a tune, anywhere, and think “Oh that would be perfect for Sun Salutation!”, or for the abs section, or for the final 4 postures. So my playlists include disco, to 80s, to recent, to RnB, to chill-out, and more.

I teach Wild too, which is faster paced than Classic or FG, so that definitely calls for an upbeat playlist – keeping you motivated when your muscles are starting to scream at you! For that I use some ‘happy house’, some 80s retro, and a couple of my own discoveries.

 

Staff Spotlight: Sophie’s India Adventure

Back in January, our lovely manager Sophie waved us goodbye and set off for a land far, far away…Now back fresh-faced, sun-kissed and with a spring in her step, this week we thought we would hear a little bit more about her trip to India: the wonderful, diverse and enriching land of yoga, curry, colour and soooo much more.

Welcome back Sophie! We’ve missed you here in Brixton. It’s great to have you back. Give us a little travel summary!

In January, my boyfriend and I set off to India for 10 weeks. I’ve always been drawn to India. The brightly coloured fabrics, smell of spices and sound of sitars were calling me.  We started in Kerala in the south and travelled north up the west coast, through Karnataka, Goa and Mumbai before looping round Rajasthan and flying home from Varanasi.  This way we experienced a variety of cultures, and also followed the good weather (meaning it never got too hot, and by ‘too hot’ I mean even hotter than our very own hot room!)

Where was your favourite place?

A difficult question, as each place we went to seemed so different.  One town that really stands out for me is Bundi in Rajasthan.  I have never experienced a truer sense of community; everywhere we went we were treated like family.  We could not walk down the street without being invited in for chai or without meeting and making new friends. A very shanti place.

What were the highlights of the trip for you, Sophie?

Apart from the fact that I got to eat curry for breakfast, lunch and dinner (perfect!) my highlight has to be Holi, the festival of colour, an indescribable sensory bombardment!  The endless rhythm of drumming echoes in the air, whilst everyone plays with colour, painting EVERYTHING in sight all the colours of the rainbow… but mainly pink!

What was your experience of yoga out there? 

It was very different to practising here.  Western yoga seems to be but one small thread in a large complex tapestry.

What are you impressions of India from your trip?

Everything is more. The blue is more blue. The spice is spicier.  The sun is sunnier. The smells are smellier. The diversity is more diverse. The good is better. But the bad is worse.

What advice would you have for anyone looking to go?

Try to remain as open to new experiences as possible.  See every offer as an opportunity and every stranger as a friend.

How did you find the people, the culture etc.?

The Indian people are warm, open, kind, generous and hilarious. They have an inspiring outlook on life and speak a lot of sense.

What would you say is the most important lesson you learnt on your travels?

I learned that positivity is a choice and that time is the most precious thing we have.

What were you most looking forward to about coming back to London?

Being around all the people I love again.  Coming home, I am more appreciative than ever of the privileges in our lives:  how free I am to choose what I do, where I go and, most importantly for me, who I want to be with.

Lastly, Sophie, where is your next adventure to?

India! I am in love with the country and all it contains.  It’s so huge and diverse, I feel like I only scratched the surface. Many times I heard myself saying “Next Time”. We actually left with a longer ‘To Do’ list than when we arrived!

Om Shanti Om!

Sophie has also made a special India playlist on Spotify which you can listen to here
This is a range of India music, some very old, some very new, some pure Indian classical, some fusions and some with Indian influences or instruments. Enjoy!